How To Create A Business Budget In 14 Simple Steps

Creating a business budget is one of the most important steps you can take to ensure the financial stability of your company. To make things easier for you and your business, we’ve put together a guide to creating a business budget in 14 simple steps! By following these steps, you can create a budget that will help you keep your expenses in check and make sure that you have the funds necessary to grow your business.

 

What exactly is a business budget?

A business budget is a tool that can be used to track and manage your company’s finances. It allows you to see where your money is going and where you can cut costs. A budget can also help you plan for future expenses and make sure that you are not overspending.

Following a budget is important to your business because it allows a company to track and manage their finances. It also helps a business see where they can cut costs, makes future expenses easier to plan for, and prevents overspending. Creating and following a budget is essential for any business looking to maintain financial stability.

How To Create A Business Budget 

Creating a business budget is one of the most important things you can do to protect your company’s financial health and keep it on the path to success. By learning how to create a budget, you can make sure that your expenses are kept in check and that you have the funds necessary to grow your business.

There are a number of benefits to creating and following a budget for your business. These benefits include:

  • Tracking and managing your finances
  • Seeing where you can cut costs
  • Future expense planning
  • Preventing overspending

Creating a business budget is not as difficult as it may seem. With a little time and effort, you can create a budget that will work for your business. Let’s take a look at 14 simple steps to creating a business budget: 

1. Identify What Makes a Good Budget

A good budget is one that meets the specific needs of your business. It should be tailored to your company’s individual spending and revenue patterns. There are a number of factors you will need to take into account when creating your budget, including:

Your Estimated Revenue 

Your budget should always start with your estimated revenue. This is the money you expect to bring in from sales, investments, and other sources. Estimating your revenue can be tricky, but there are a number of methods you can use to get an accurate estimate. These methods include using historical data, industry averages, and market trends.

Your Fixed Costs 

Your fixed costs are those expenses that you will have to pay regardless of how much revenue you bring in. These costs include things like rent, insurance, and salaries. When estimating your fixed costs, be sure to include all of the necessary expenses for running your business.

Your Variable Costs 

Your variable costs are those expenses that fluctuate based on your revenue. These costs include things like inventory, shipping, and marketing. When estimating your variable costs, be sure to use historical data and industry averages to get an accurate estimate.

Your One-Off Costs 

One-off costs are those expenses that you will only have to pay once. These costs include things like equipment, software, and legal fees. When estimating your one-off costs, be sure to include all of the necessary expenses for setting up your business.

Your Cash Flow 

Your cash flow is the money that you have available to pay your expenses. This includes money from sales, investments, and other sources. When estimating your cash flow, be sure to include all of the necessary sources of income for your business.

Your Profit 

Your profit margin is the amount of money you have left after you pay all of your expenses. This is the money you will use to reinvest in your business or to take home as profit. When estimating your profit margin, be sure to include all of the necessary expenses for running your business.

2. Learn Small Business Budgets for Different Types of Company 

There are a number of different types of business structures, and each one has its own unique budgeting needs. The type of business structure you have will determine the specific budgeting requirements for your business. 

Let’s take a look at the various types of business and how to best budget for them: 

Seasonal Businesses 

Seasonal businesses are those that experience a spike in sales during certain times of the year. This could be due to holidays, weather patterns, or other factors. Seasonal businesses will need to budget for both their busy and slow periods. 

During the busy season, businesses will need to account for increased costs such as inventory, staffing, and marketing. During the slow season, businesses will need to account for decreased revenue and cut costs accordingly. 

Ecommerce Businesses 

Ecommerce businesses are those that sell products or services online. These businesses will need to budget for a number of different costs, including website development, hosting, and marketing. In addition, ecommerce businesses will need to account for the cost of shipping and handling. 

Inventory Businesses 

Places that sell physical goods fall under the category of inventory businesses. These companies will need to budget for the cost of inventory, including the cost of goods sold and storage. In addition, inventory businesses will need to account for the cost of shipping and handling. 

Customer Order Businesses 

Customer order businesses are just as they sound: the business takes orders from the customer and then manufactures or sources the products. These businesses will need to budget for the cost of goods, labor, and shipping. In addition, customer order businesses will need to account for the cost of marketing and advertising. 

Startups 

Startups are businesses that are in the early stages of development. These businesses will need to budget for a number of different costs, including research and development, marketing, and staffing. Depending on where you want to take your startup, you may need to budget in physical spaces, like an office or store, or more abstract needs, like a website or patent. 

Service Businesses 

Service businesses provide a service to their customers, as opposed to a product. These businesses will need to budget for the cost of labor, materials, and overhead. In addition, service businesses will need to account for the cost of marketing and advertising. 

3. Tally Your Income Sources 

One of the early stages of creating a business budget is to determine your income sources. This includes all of the money that you expect to come into your business. When estimating your income, be sure to include all of the necessary sources of income for your business. 

4. Analyze All Your Business Costs 

Business costs can be divided into two categories: fixed costs and variable costs. Fixed costs are those that stay the same each month, such as rent or a mortgage payment. Variable costs are those that fluctuate from month to month, such as inventory or marketing. 

When creating your budget, you will need to account for both your fixed and variable costs. To get started, make a list of all of your business expenses. Then, estimate how much each expense will cost you each month. 

5. Negotiate Costs with Suppliers 

One way to save money on business expenses is to negotiate with your suppliers. This is especially true for businesses that have a lot of inventory costs. When negotiating with suppliers, be sure to let them know how much business you bring them. In many cases, they will be willing to lower their prices in order to keep your business. 

6. Estimate Your Revenue 

Income and expenses are two of the most important factors in creating a business budget. To get started, you will need to estimate your revenue for the upcoming year. When estimating your revenue, be sure to include all of the necessary sources of income for your business. 

7. Determine Your Gross Profit Margin 

Your gross profit margin is the amount of money that you have left after you subtract your costs from your revenue. To calculate your gross profit margin, simply divide your gross profit by your revenue. 

It’s important to understand your gross profit margin because it will give you an idea of how much money you have to work with each month. In addition, your gross profit margin will help you set realistic financial goals for your business, which is very important when it comes to business finance. 

8. Project Your Cash Flow 

Cash flow is the amount of money that you have coming into your business each month. When creating your business budget, you can calculate your cash flow by adding up all of your income sources and subtracting all of your business expenses. 

9. Factor in Seasonal and Industry Trends 

When creating your budget, it’s important to factor in seasonal and industry trends. This is especially true for businesses that are affected by the weather or have a lot of inventory costs. For example, if you own a clothing store, you will need to account for the fact that sales will slow down during the winter months. 

10. Set Your Spending Goals 

Once you have a good understanding of your income and expenses, you will need to set spending goals for your business. When setting spending goals, it’s important to be realistic. Otherwise, you may find yourself in financial trouble down the road. 

A good way to set spending goals is to divide your expenses into two categories: fixed costs and variable costs. Then, set a budget for each category. For example, you may decide that you want to spend no more than 10% of your revenue on marketing expenses. 

11. Arrange Your Expenses by Category 

After you have set your spending goals, you will need to arrange your expenses by category. This will help you stay organized and on track with your budget. For example, you may want to create a separate budget for marketing, inventory, and rent. 

12. Make Sure to Separate Your Personal and Business Budgets 

One of the most important things to remember when creating a business budget is to keep your personal and business finances separate. This is very important because it will help you avoid financial problems down the road. 

13. Leverage Small Business Budgeting Templates

Small business budget templates are a great way to get started with your business budget. They provide a guideline for tracking expenses and income and come in handy, particularly if you’ve never put a budget together before. There are a number of small business budgeting templates available online. These templates can be very useful when it comes to creating a budget for your business so you might as well take advantage of them!

14. Review Your Budget Consistently 

A budget is an ongoing project that should be reviewed on a regular basis. At a minimum, you should review your budget every quarter then reassess to make sure you’re on track for where you want to be by the end of each year. This will help you make sure that your business is on track and that your spending goals are still realistic and it will also allow you to adjust throughout the year as necessary. 

The Bottom Line

By following these simple steps, you can create a business budget that will help you keep track of your expenses and make sure that your business is on track. A budget is an important tool for any business owner and it’s one that should be reviewed on a regular basis. By taking the time to create a budget and review it regularly, you can ensure that your business is on the right track and that you’re making sound financial decisions.

If you’re still curious about all things business-related, check out our other great articles and sign up for our free email updates to help optimize your cash flow and grow your business into the thriving success it deserves to be!

 

Related Posts

© 2022 WEALTH FACTORY, LLC® | ALL RIGHTS RESERVED |
About | Contact | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer

Disclaimer and Waiver - Wealth Factory, LLC®, its owners, officers, directors, employees, subsidiaries, service providers, content providers and agents (referred to as "Wealth Factory") are not financial or investment advisors and not licensed to sell securities or investments. None of the information provided is intended as investment, tax, accounting or legal advice, as an offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or as an endorsement, of any company, security, fund, or other offering. The information should not be relied upon for purposes of transacting securities or other investments. Your use of the information contained herein is at your own risk. The content is provided 'as is' and without warranties, either expressed or implied. Wealth Factory does not promise or guarantee any income or particular result from your use of the information contained herein. Under no circumstances will Wealth Factory be liable for any loss or damage caused by your reliance on the information contained herein. It is your responsibility to evaluate any information, opinion, advice or other content contained. Please seek the advice of professionals, as appropriate, regarding the evaluation of any specific information, opinion, or other content.